by Bill Venners, July 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
This article fleshes out the advantages and disadvantages of objects compared to documents when sending a service across the network to software, in the absence of a client-side user.
Sponsored Links
by Bill Venners, June 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
Java's Creator James Gosling talks with Bill Venners about the many Java-related topics.
by Susan Hupfer, June 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
A space-based compute server is a powerful, all-purpose computing engine that accepts tasks, computes them, and returns results. In this article, Susanne Hupfer shows how to use Jini transactions to make the compute server application from Part 2 more robust and multiple JavaSpace services to make it more scalable.
by Bill Venners, June 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
In this article, the first of three parts, I compare the traditional approach to client-server interaction, using protocols and documents, with Jini's approach of using objects and interfaces. This first part looks at how objects and documents differ when servers interact with client programs that have no client-side user.
by Eric Freeman and Susan Hupfer, April 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
Jini transactions help build distributed applications that operate correctly in the presence of partial failure. To date, Jini transactions remain one of the less frequently used features of Jini. This article provides a brief overview of Jini transactions and shows how you can use them with the JavaSpaces service.
by Bill Venners, March 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
In this article, I look at a fundamental issue with network-mobile code: clients (such as Jini browsers) that load objects of which they have no prior knowledge cannot invoke cleanup methods on those objects. I propose a solution to this problem, using the finalize() method declared in class Object.
by Susan Hupfer, March 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
In this article, author Suzanne Hupfer uses a simple game service example to show you how to use spaces and their operations to coordinate your Jini applications.
by Bill Venners, February 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
In this article, I look at ways Jini clients can search for desired services in the Jini lookup service. I describe both the flexibility of the lookup service as well as its inherent limitations. I proposes a way that the ServiceRegistrar interface could evolve, and describes the Jini team's response.
by Eric Freeman, January 2000, Submit comment Submit comment
This article examines Jini's dynamic class-loading ability, showing how it enables the exchange of executable content through JavaSpaces and how you can leverage it to develop a powerful general-purpose compute server.
by Eric Freeman and Susan Hupfer, November 1999, Submit comment Submit comment
This article teaches you about a simple, yet powerful, new network and distributed programming tool: JavaSpaces. It explains the basic concepts of the JavaSpaces programming model and introduces the compact JavaSpaces API.
by Bill Venners, October 1999, Submit comment Submit comment
This article describes the basic architecture for Jini services that have UIs. It shows how separating the UI of a Jini service from the functionality enables Jini services to be accessed from many different kinds of computers and devices.
by Bill Venners, October 1999, Submit comment Submit comment
This article gives a brief history of the ServiceUI project at jini.org. It provides a glimpse into the nascent Jini Community process, and gives a link to the current ServiceUI proposal.
by Bill Venners, August 1999, Submit comment Submit comment
This article attempts to explain not how Jini works, but why it exists. It illuminates on the unique value of Jini technology, reports on the recent Jini Community Summit, and considers Bill Joy's comments on his creation.
by Bill Venners, June 1999, Submit comment Submit comment
Java's Creator James Gosling talks with Bill Venners about the current state of the Java language.
by Bill Venners, June 1999, Submit comment Submit comment
This article introduces Sun Microsystems's Jini technology; demonstrates how Jini enables services on a network to find each other through the processes of discovery, join, and lookup; and explains how Jini's architecture brings the benefits of object-oriented programming to the network.
Advertisement