The Artima Developer Community
Sponsored Link

Articles Forum
BEA's Nasir Khan Explains SIP

4 replies on 1 page. Most recent reply: May 23, 2007 8:44 PM by Nasir Khan

Welcome Guest
  Sign In

Go back to the topic listing  Back to Topic List Click to reply to this topic  Reply to this Topic Click to search messages in this forum  Search Forum Click for a threaded view of the topic  Threaded View   
Previous Topic   Next Topic
Flat View: This topic has 4 replies on 1 page
Frank Sommers

Posts: 2642
Nickname: fsommers
Registered: Jan, 2002

BEA's Nasir Khan Explains SIP Posted: May 16, 2007 8:00 PM
Reply to this message Reply
Advertisement
In this interview, Nasir Khan describes the use-case for the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP):

http://www.artima.com/lejava/articles/javaone_2007_nasir_khan.html

What do you think of the uses of SIP in enterprise applications?


Michael Hobbs

Posts: 51
Nickname: hobb0001
Registered: Dec, 2004

Re: BEA's Nasir Khan Explains SIP Posted: May 17, 2007 11:02 AM
Reply to this message Reply
Tip: If you want people to invest the time in listening to an audio interview, you're going to have to at least describe it enough to make people interested in what it's about. I don't even know what SIP is, much less know why I should care about it. (Well, I do know now, after taking it upon myself to read the Wikipedia article.)

In contrast to text, you can't point people to a piece of audio and say "just listen to it." With text, it's much easier to quickly scan it to see if it's at all interesting.

I know this message comes off as blunt (if not rude), but I'm truly trying to provide a tip and not just being mean.

Berco Beute

Posts: 72
Nickname: berco
Registered: Jan, 2002

Re: BEA's Nasir Khan Explains SIP Posted: May 17, 2007 3:08 PM
Reply to this message Reply
The core idea behind SIP is good but unfortunately there are too many (telco!) parties involved, which making the specification unnecessary complex. The fact that developers will always use the 'simplest solution that could possibly work' spells trouble for the future of SIP. For many problems there are alternative technologies that could be used (xmpp, twitter, mail,... ).

SIP makes perfect sense on mobile devices, but unfortunately SIP is still far from standardized there. Implementations are proprietary and differ slightly. I, for instance, wish there was a decent open source JME SIP implementation...

Nasir Khan

Posts: 2
Nickname: nasirkhan
Registered: May, 2007

Re: BEA's Nasir Khan Explains SIP Posted: May 23, 2007 8:24 PM
Reply to this message Reply
> What do you think of the uses of SIP in enterprise
> applications?

SIP is becoming increasingly popular in the enterprise. You may actually be using it without even knowing if you use new Yahoo IM which uses SIP for IM.
- There are several IP-PBX solutions that use SIP like Asterisk.
- I know of several conferencing providers that you may be using for your business use SIP.
- There is a whole range of products/services around Voice/Data integration.
- CTI applications, particularly for call centers heavily use SIP.

The SIP Servlet specification brings SIP together with HTTP (actually you can write converged servlets/JSPs that speak both SIP and HTTP) and thus opens the door to innovation around interesting converged voice/data applications.

Nasir Khan

Posts: 2
Nickname: nasirkhan
Registered: May, 2007

Re: BEA's Nasir Khan Explains SIP Posted: May 23, 2007 8:44 PM
Reply to this message Reply
> The core idea behind SIP is good but unfortunately there
> are too many (telco!) parties involved, which making the
> specification unnecessary complex.

SIP is being developed in IETF (where HTTP was also developed). The fact that there is involvement of people from telco background/companies is a very good thing, because the lessons learnt and patterns discovered of over 100 years of telephony will not be lost.
Having said that both IETF and Java Specifications for SIP are striving for open standards and open APIs that easy to use and lower the entry barrier for developers.


> developers will always use the 'simplest solution that
> could possibly work' spells trouble for the future of SIP.

If you can understand -

public class MyHttpServlet extends HttpServlet {
private PrintWriter out = null;
public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request,
HttpServletResponse response)
throws IOException, ServletException {
response.setContentType("text/html");
out = response.getWriter();

// write the HTML header
out.println("<html>Hello</html>");
}
}


Then you can certainly understand the following SIP Servlet snippet.


public class MySipServlet extends SipServlet {
public void doInvite(SipServletRequest req)
throws IOException {
req.createResponse(180).send();
req.createResponse(200).send();
}
}


Where "INVITE" is one of the SIP messages like "GET" is for HTTP.


> For many problems there are alternative technologies that
> could be used (xmpp, twitter, mail,... ).
>
> SIP makes perfect sense on mobile devices, but
> unfortunately SIP is still far from standardized there.

On the contrary SIP is getting great mileage in 3gpp (www.3gpp.org) and OMA (http://www.openmobilealliance.org/) and there is also a J2ME JSR for SIP
http://www.jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=180

> Implementations are proprietary and differ slightly. I,
> for instance, wish there was a decent open source JME SIP
> implementation...

There are several open source implementations, while you cannot stop people from adding proprietary extensions overall it bodes well for the SIP development as it indicates a vibrant community.

Flat View: This topic has 4 replies on 1 page
Topic: Jacob Lehrbaum Explains JavaFX Mobile Previous Topic   Next Topic Topic: Tangosol's Cameron Purdy on the Importance of Design


Sponsored Links



Google
  Web Artima.com   

Copyright © 1996-2014 Artima, Inc. All Rights Reserved. - Privacy Policy - Terms of Use - Advertise with Us