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Computing Thoughts
Community Book Creation: Python 3 Patterns and Idioms
by Bruce Eckel
September 25, 2008
Summary
If Python's what I want to do, I should write that book about it. Herein I muse about how to create a book relying largely on community input and help.

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Another epiphany from hanging out with the Pythonistas in Brazil: After a dozen years, Python is still the only language I get really jazzed about. I should do something about it, so that I can do my consulting and speaking and training in Python rather than languages I'm not so thrilled about. To wit: write that book.

Several years ago I started Thinking in Python, which has been in limbo for quite awhile. But when I was actively working on it, I was getting some great input from the community. What I'd like to do now is:

The best way to produce a quality book in a short time is if I can concentrate on editing, writing and rewriting. I know from experience that noise from the other things can easily sidetrack me.

The working title is Python 3 Patterns & Idioms (for various reasons I may not be able to use my "Thinking in" title; don't ask). It would not be a book that develops from simple to complex the way that Thinking in C++ and Thinking in Java do, but rather a collection of different programming techniques, which lends itself better to a collaborative effort since you don't have to worry so much about whether basic things have been covered (it won't be an intro book) or the order of coverage, etc. Each chapter becomes a standalone short article.

Important tenets of the book:

Questions:

I've started a Google Group for the project. If you're interested, apply for membership.

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About the Blogger

Bruce Eckel (www.BruceEckel.com) provides development assistance in Python with user interfaces in Flex. He is the author of Thinking in Java (Prentice-Hall, 1998, 2nd Edition, 2000, 3rd Edition, 2003, 4th Edition, 2005), the Hands-On Java Seminar CD ROM (available on the Web site), Thinking in C++ (PH 1995; 2nd edition 2000, Volume 2 with Chuck Allison, 2003), C++ Inside & Out (Osborne/McGraw-Hill 1993), among others. He's given hundreds of presentations throughout the world, published over 150 articles in numerous magazines, was a founding member of the ANSI/ISO C++ committee and speaks regularly at conferences.

This weblog entry is Copyright © 2008 Bruce Eckel. All rights reserved.

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