The Artima Developer Community
Sponsored Link

Articles Forum
The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever

6 replies on 1 page. Most recent reply: Sep 4, 2006 10:16 PM by Greg Colvin

Welcome Guest
  Sign In

Go back to the topic listing  Back to Topic List Click to reply to this topic  Reply to this Topic Click to search messages in this forum  Search Forum Click for a threaded view of the topic  Threaded View   
Previous Topic   Next Topic
Flat View: This topic has 6 replies on 1 page
Bill Venners

Posts: 2248
Nickname: bv
Registered: Jan, 2002

The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever Posted: Aug 16, 2006 12:00 AM
Reply to this message Reply
Advertisement
In this article, Scott Meyers shares his picks for the five most important non-book publications in the history of C++, along with why he chose them.

http://www.artima.com/cppsource/top_cpp_publications.html

What do you think of Scott's choices? What other C++ publications do you feel have been important in the history of C++, and why?


Pal Balog

Posts: 1
Nickname: pasa
Registered: Aug, 2006

Re: The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever Posted: Aug 16, 2006 1:43 PM
Reply to this message Reply
I miss Guro of the Week from the list. Though it may count as a different kind of "publication" that didn't play in this category.

Scott Meyers

Posts: 5
Nickname: sdm
Registered: Aug, 2006

Re: The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever Posted: Aug 17, 2006 6:32 PM
Reply to this message Reply
To be honest, I didn't consider the GOTW series, but had I, it might well have made the list. I can't think of any single GOTW article that alone would be important enough to dislodge any of the entries I listed, but the series as a whole might have, especially considering the impact of the books that were spun off from the series.

Roland Pibinger

Posts: 93
Nickname: rp123
Registered: Jan, 2006

Re: The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever Posted: Aug 18, 2006 2:11 PM
Reply to this message Reply
For me C++ articles about resource management are the most important, eg.

Bartosz Milewski: Resource Management in C++. JOOP 10(1): 14-22 (1997)
Tom Cargill: Managing Dynamic Objects in C++. DDJ Jul 22 (2001) http://www.ddj.com/184409895

Bjarne Stroustrup

Posts: 60
Nickname: bjarne
Registered: Oct, 2003

Re: The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever Posted: Aug 25, 2006 12:51 PM
Reply to this message Reply
I think we may systematically underestimate the importance of "non-publications" such as websites, newsgroups, and other web sources. consider comp.lang.c++ and alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++. Does anyone have hard numbers and ways of calibrating?

For years (almost 7 years now), "Learning Standard C++ as a new language" averaged 100 downloads a day. That's not my most popular "page" either. This adds up. I suspect that less conventional, less "serious", and more responsive sites may have overwhelmed the conventional sources of information.

Brian Neal

Posts: 2
Nickname: bgn
Registered: Aug, 2006

Re: The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever Posted: Aug 28, 2006 10:15 AM
Reply to this message Reply
Marshall Cline's C++ FAQ Lite on the web is an extremely useful resource which contains best practices and very helpful advice.

http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/

That and comp.lang.c++.moderated are my two non-book resources that I use the most.

Greg Colvin

Posts: 9
Nickname: gregc
Registered: Jun, 2004

Re: The Most Important C++ Non-Book Publications...Ever Posted: Sep 4, 2006 10:16 PM
Reply to this message Reply
As for exception-safety language in the standard...

The nothrow guarantee is expressed as "Throws: Nothing ..." and the strong guarantee is expressed as "If an exception is thrown ... there are no effects.", where the ellipsis contains any "unless" or "except" clauses needed. This wording was chosen to fit with how the standard library was already described, and to minimize the number of edits to a document that was supposed to be almost done.

The basic guarantee for things in the standard basically amounts to "X does what the standard says it does." It applies to everything in the standard, for lack of any permission to violate it, and so goes unsaid.

As terse as it is, the standard is still too long, so introducing non-normative definitions of terms not actually used was a nonstarter.

And so it came to be that the phrases "strong guarantee," "basic guarantee," and "nothrow guarantee" don't appear in the standard. Not all that interesting, but there you have it.

Flat View: This topic has 6 replies on 1 page
Topic: Event Tracking in a Mobile Environment Previous Topic   Next Topic Topic: The Future of NetBeans


Sponsored Links



Google
  Web Artima.com   

Copyright © 1996-2014 Artima, Inc. All Rights Reserved. - Privacy Policy - Terms of Use - Advertise with Us