BEA's Nasir Khan Explains SIP

Interviews from JavaOne 2007

by Frank Sommers and Bill Venners
May 16, 2007

Summary
At the 2007 JavaOne conference, Bill Venners and I interviewed developers and companies about important ideas behind their projects and products. In today's installment of this Artima mini-series, BEA architect and JSR 289 spec lead Nasir Khan explains the importance of the SIP protocol and SIP servlets.

Bill Venners and I recorded a series of short audio interviews at JavaOne 2007 with developers and companies doing interesting things in the Java community. In the coming weeks, we will publish one interview each day in the form of a short audio file.

Each interview focuses on a single idea that we think presents some new technology, tool, or a different view on a subject you're already familiar with. Our goal with this mini-series is to give you a feel for the latest developments in the Java space, and to gather new and interesting ideas for you to ponder.

In the first installment of this interview series, BEA architect and JSR 289, SIP Servlet 1.1, specification lead Nasir Khan explains the use-cases for the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) used in applications ranging from peer-to-peer software to voice-over-IP phones calls. The JCP honored Khan at JavaOne 2007 by naming him a Star Spec Lead in recognition for his work on Java standards.

Click to download audio Nasir Khan, Architect at BEA Systems and Spec Lead for JSR 289, SIP Servlet, talks about the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). (4 minutes)

If the idea behind SIP and SIP Servlets strikes a chord with you, whether harmonic or dissonant, we encourage you to post in the discussion forum.

Talk back!

Have an opinion? Readers have already posted 4 comments about this article. Why not add yours?

About the authors

Bill Venners is president of Artima, Inc. He is author of the book, Inside the Java Virtual Machine, a programmer-oriented survey of the Java platform's architecture and internals. His popular columns in JavaWorld magazine covered Java internals, object-oriented design, and Jini. Bill has been active in the Jini Community since its inception. He led the Jini Community's ServiceUI project, whose ServiceUI API became the de facto standard way to associate user interfaces to Jini services. Bill also serves as an elected member of the Jini Community's initial Technical Oversight Committee (TOC), and in this role helped to define the governance process for the community.

Frank Sommers is Editor-in-Chief of Artima Developer. He also serves as chief editor of the IEEE Technical Committee on Scalable Computing's newsletter, and is an elected member of the Jini Community's Technical Advisory Committee. Prior to joining Artima, Frank wrote the Jiniology and Web services columns for JavaWorld.